Pointer to member operators .* ->* (C++ only)

There are two pointer to member operators: .* and ->*.

The .* operator is used to dereference pointers to class members. The first operand must be of class type. If the type of the first operand is class type T, or is a class that has been derived from class type T, the second operand must be a pointer to a member of a class type T.

The ->* operator is also used to dereference pointers to class members. The first operand must be a pointer to a class type. If the type of the first operand is a pointer to class type T, or is a pointer to a class derived from class type T, the second operand must be a pointer to a member of class type T.

The .* and ->* operators bind the second operand to the first, resulting in an object or function of the type specified by the second operand.

If the result of .* or ->* is a function, you can only use the result as the operand for the ( ) (function call) operator. If the second operand is an lvalue, the result of .* or ->* is an lvalue.

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